Through the lens of Cop Shiva

Cop Shiva believes that he is still a village boy even though it has been many years since he left Ramnagar, his birthplace and came to Bangalore in search of a livelihood. “Everybody needs jobs and I have not studied much. I have studied only till the 10th standard. I used to work in different kinds of jobs but I was very good in sports. Because of that reason, I applied for the police services and got it”. Before becoming Cop Shiva, the photographer he was Shivaraju BS, the policeman and even before that he worked as railway policeman. The need for a secure job was important for him as he was the sole breadwinner for his family. “My job as a cop gave me a lot of strength, it has resulted in me respecting people and has taught me how to deal with people”, he says with a smile. This helped him a lot in the long run when he started capturing the lives of ordinary people with extraordinary stories through the lens.

Although he was happy about his job, Shiva had an artistic side which hadn’t yet seen the light of day. He recalls his days as a young boy when he used to read novels and was fascinated by Kannada art films. Apart from him, nobody in his family had any affiliation with the arts. “During my free time, I used to work as a program coordinator at 1 Shanthiroad art gallery. I used to go there and attend the exhibitions and I helped director Suresh Jairam in running the place”. This was the moment for him to discover his passion. He met a lot of artists from different nations who came to the gallery as part of residency programmes. By this time he had taken charge of organising events there and helping out the artists in building their projects. He was also in charge of documentation and picked up a camera for the same. “I started out with a small camera and I was always surrounded by artists, filmmakers, photographers. Over time, I realised that I wanted to do something similar”, Shiva says. But why photography? The answer lies in his 14 years of service as a policeman. He was always out on the streets, surrounded by people, people and more people. This made him understand their lives and as he was a local guy, things were all the more convenient for him. “It is easier to work within your community or within your own people. I feel that as an artist, you always have to work with your community; you have to look around within your circle. No need to look somewhere else”, he says. This resulted in him creating two of his very finest projects Being Gandhi and I Love MGR. Both of these projects have been exhibited in countries like the US, UK, Switzerland and Bangladesh. The former project was recently displayed at The Frank Museum of Art in Otterbein University, Ohio. He remarks that the Gandhi project which started in the year 2009 is still ongoing. “There was a time when people thought that Bagadehalli Basavaraj (the man impersonating Gandhi) was mentally ill. But now they respect him more than ever”, his voice has a tone of achievement.

Shiva has had a knack for looking at what he calls the “hidden” and this has been sort of a driving force for him to keep looking for new subjects. There are untold and ignored stories of people hiding in plain sight. He believes that one has to be curious and observant of the things happening in his/her surroundings. It is not entirely necessary that one has to go to faraway places to document something when there is so much that is waiting to be discovered in your own neighbourhood. And this is clearly reflected from his most recent project titled Ecstasy which chronicles the many obscure festivals and rituals happening in Bangalore. In a time when media has decided not to bring these facets of life to the mainstream, Shiva believes that these stories can be unearthed only if one is constantly observant. For him, this might be capturing some tree or wall while people around you wonder what on earth is there to take a picture of. The eye of a photographer finds beauty in the most mundane. “It is difficult to describe how I have developed that instinct, it is a connection in your mind itself”, he says. He has been a witness to the change this city has gone through but his eye as a photographer still revels in the way he was brought up. “I have been living in this city for a long time now but I still consider myself as a village boy. Maybe the way you look at things is what matters. For me, I think the city is changing only for a certain kind of people”, Shiva quotes.

Pictures from I Love MGR (L) and Being Gandhi (R) Source: copshiva.com

For a photographer, consistency of work is paramount. True, there are times when one may not be able to find the perfect subject but that doesn’t mean one should get disheartened. The reason why Shiva chooses not to take names of people whose works he has admired is due to the fact that many of them have given up photography altogether. “The thing is, now it is easy to buy a camera and consider oneself as a photographer. But you constantly have to keep continuing your work. Only then you will get a good grip, you will get good subjects and it will be possible to create a good body of work”. Of course, there have been times for him when the project reaches a point where it moves slowly due to various factors. It takes time to build up a connection with a person as a subject and that requires a lot of planning. It is a two-way process in which the subject has to be comfortable with the artist as well for a fruitful outcome. For Shiva, a project can go on for as long as ten years but it can never actually reach a point of conclusion because there will always be a new perspective which will mushroom up. He gives the example of his Gandhi project and goes on to say that now he is finding new ways to project it differently. There are a lot of ideas and some of them might not work out but that doesn’t count as a failure.

Looking back at his life as a young boy from a small village, Shiva regrets the fact that he wasn’t born 20 years earlier. With gleaming eyes, he goes on to describe how as an artist it is necessary to look back in the past because it shapes who you are; all your experiences and ideas are noteworthy. “You can compare them and maybe work on an idea which came to you five years ago”, he reveals. His love for films has been a constant for around 20 years and every now and then he has an urge to work in that direction. As of now, this ambition is kept for another day because there are always financial aspects to consider first. No matter how ambitious his aspirations have been, his family has been a constant support for him. “My mother and sister don’t know much about art but they are happy with what I am doing and they are confident about me because I started working when I was 15 years old. I took care of my sister, my nephews. They are all settled now” he says with a smile.

At the onset of his career, Shiva was working rigorously without taking any breaks but now, he has reached a point where he can slow down a bit and reflect on what he has done. But still, he feels that there is a lot that needs to be done. One of the things that he wants to make a reality from his long list of to-dos is to travel across the country. He has been to many places abroad; he recently attended a three-month residency programme in Sweden and there is an upcoming one in Switzerland. “Because of my life and job as a policeman, I couldn’t travel much. There are a lot of things I have missed” he says. Apart from that, there are three projects in the pipeline which will be seeing the light of day soon.

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Church Street 2017: In pictures

 

 

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Church Street is located almost in the middle of the map of Bangalore and is regarded by many as the numero uno destination for the youth of the city. The 750 metres stretch houses some of the most iconic places in Bangalore like Blossom Book House, Church Street Social, Amoeba Sports Bar, Indian Coffee House, Hotel Empire and numerous pubs for the thirsty weekenders. BBMP took an ambitious step in February 2017 to create an underground electricity and water pipeline system and as a result, the entire stretch of road had to be dug up. The estimated time allotted for the entire project was six months. It has been more than six months now and the work is far from complete. Business has been affected and the public hasn’t been happy with the turn of events. The pictures below show the Church Street of 2017.

 

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If one gets down in front of Hotel Empire, this is what he/she would be greeted with. Currently, this part of the street is the most affected as there is construction happening on both sides of the road as a result of which entry to Church Street has been stopped temporarily. Parking outside Hotel Empire has been prohibited, much to the dismay of the staff. “Business has been hit really hard. People have turned away because there is no place to park their huge vehicles”, says Sayed, an employee of Hotel Empire. Access to the hotel has been closed from one side which has been causing inconvenience to customers. The street becomes increasingly muddy due to all of the digging which is a nightmare for pedestrians.

 

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These are the pipes which have been laid down alongside the road. All of them are electrical lines while a central concrete pipe runs beneath, carrying water from the storm drains. There will be underground junction boxes beside the electrical lines. Also, there will be manholes like the one visible in the picture above. Abbas, a worker in the BBMP says, “It has been problematic for us to work because of the traffic. It is a good thing vehicular entry is barred now. Most of the delay is only due to traffic and the rains. Work will be over mostly within the next three months”.  The electrical wires inside the pipes haven’t been laid yet and Abbas is clueless as to when that will be done. One can see that the trees alongside the road have been preserved although there are a few which had to be cut down.

 

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Entry of four wheelers has been prohibited in the area and parking on the side of the road would result in towing. The towing truck makes multiple rounds in the area and it is mostly the two wheelers who become the prey. As I was standing alongside the road, one guy came in an Audi and asked a man standing beside me for a place where one could pay some cash and park his/her vehicle. The man said he had never heard of such a place and warned him about the towing truck. “There’s no way they can tow the car away. Look at the road. I would love to see them try”, the man chuckled and walked off. Traders have been demanding the complete ban of vehicles which is the chief reason behind the delay in the completion of the project. Vehicles make walking all the more difficult as there is always one car that is stuck in the middle of the road somewhere.

 

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It was a Saturday afternoon. One doesn’t need to be informed that Saturdays are the time of the week when Church Street comes to life. In spite of all the inconvenience, there was a line of youngsters waiting outside Russh, one of the most happening pubs in the area, known for its attractive happy hour offers. Such is the spirit of Bangaloreans! “I don’t come here frequently. I thought I will come here and park my scooter but then I had to go all the way around to MG Road and park it and then I had to walk till here. That’s a real inconvenience”, says Afnas, a student.

 

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The work is more or less complete once you cross Blossoms Book House. The footpaths are yet to be constructed properly and there are uncovered manholes everywhere. All the establishments alongside the road were given a notice prior to the start of the project and most of them had been supportive of the idea. But, as time has passed, business has been hit and there has been a foul cry due to that. “It’s not that bad anymore. Earlier, the water from the streets used to come when the digging was taking place. All the shops had to pay for the new electrical connections but I don’t think anyone has complained with regard to all that. We believe that it is for the greater good so it’s fine”, says Rooh, an employee at Amoeba Sports Bar. One of the BBMP workers told me that the entire complex which houses shops like Hysteria and the electronics shops (picture above) will be demolished and a new building has been instructed to set up.

 

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Uncovered manholes like this pose a grave threat to pedestrians, especially when it is raining.

 

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This is the road right next to the Times Network office and is the zone where most of the work is taking place. The first impression one would get from looking at this site is an area struck by a bomb blast. Electrical and water pipes crisscross each other and it is difficult to make out which is going where. Workers have been working tirelessly to complete the work in this zone. Vehicular traffic is completely prohibited as there is no place for cars to go. One can only imagine the plight of people living in the houses on the far side of the street due to this disruption.

The redevelopment project for the roads has been undertaken by TenderSURE with a budget of Rs. 9 crores. The entire project was divided into two phases. This part of the area belongs to Phase I while Phase II is from Rest House Crescent Road junction to St. Mark’s Road junction. So the next you go to Church Street, don’t be surprised if a JCB like the one above is blocking your path, although it is highly advisable to not tread this road when it’s raining.

 

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All photographs have been taken with a Moto G3 and have been post-processed using VSCO

Chronicling KR Market

These photographs describe my journey to KR Market (Krishna Rajendra Market) and the different things I saw and experienced. All the photographs are taken by me using my cell phone. The pictures have been post processed up to a certain extent. The photographs were taken on 26th February 2017.

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Although KR Market is situated only three kilometres from where I live, I had never had the opportunity to visit this place. One of my friends sent me a link to an event which was happening in the so-called KR Flower Market. I had seen pictures of this place but didn’t have any idea as to what it was really like. Taking an auto, I was whisked away to a place which was different from the Bengaluru I usually got to see. Away from all the glass structures and multinational IT companies, KR Market was a place that was disorganised. This was the first word that came to my mind. Honking buses, auto rickshaws slithering down around like cockroaches, people crossing the road without any kind of warning sign, flyovers spanning overhead and the indefinite noise; this was how KR Market welcomed me. The weather was searing and as I got out of the auto, I saw people bustling around me, the big white mosque to my right, a big red building to my left, traffic policemen trying to regulate the traffic, buses still honking and Google Maps shutting down unexpectedly. I started walking towards this mysterious KR Flower Market.

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Taking directions from a boy who was selling vegetables, I came to know that the Flower Market was in a building behind the red building. Crossing the road, I entered this huge complex which had numerous shops which sold mainly two commodities i.e. hardware items and flowers. I asked another guy as to where the courtyard of the Flower Market was and he told me to walk down the corridors and take a left. KR Market took me back to Chowk Bazaar in Tezpur. Narrow lanes with shops on both sides but the only difference here were that almost all these shops sold flowers. There were shops selling varying types of jasmine that are usually used to make gajra along with garlands and other flowers. The air had an odour which resembled the mixture of several different flowers, pungent but somehow choking at the same time. After walking a few more steps, I could hear the sound of drums beating in the distance. I knew that my destination was nearing and I followed the sound.

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The drum beats grew louder as I approached the courtyard of the flower market. It was a huge open space where flowers were being sold on all four sides. There was a crowd gathered around near a tall pillar where a mural had been unveiled. Beneath the mural was four men drumming djembes in a much pepped up beat and hands were raised recording the performance. Inching a bit closer into the crowd, I heard the sound of someone playing the flute as well and saw a woman dancing. The courtyard had baskets full of flowers, placed in huge mounds. Red, orange, violet, pink, it was a spectacular display of colour. A kind I had never seen before and which left me in awe. People around me were clicking pictures, whistling and craning their necks. People on the second and third floors of the building were peering down at the performers, hooting and whistling occasionally. A few customers roamed around, checking flowers to buy while there were a few groups who were silently weaving garlands. A few foreigners were astounded by what was happening around them. This place was alive with activity!

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I decided to go upstairs to get a bird’s eye view. And this is what I saw

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Hardware shops adorned the first and the second floor of the entire complex. And most of these shops sold drilling machines. There were shops selling pumps, bathroom fittings, electronic items, tools and hardware, even steel and aluminium utensils but drilling and drilling repair shops outnumbered everything else. Somehow, this gave an industrial edge to the whole place. These shops stayed away from the flower shops and were creating a contrasting dimension within the whole place.

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I decided to leave the courtyard and decided to explore the other parts of the market. Never in my life did I know that selling flowers can be such a big business idea. There were people who were feeding entire families just by engaging in this business and the daily transaction that happened created a lot of revenue. What was even more interesting was the variety of flowers one could find in this place. It included everything from roses to jasmines, crossandras, barlerias and much more. I couldn’t help but think about where these flowers came from, where were they grown and how they were available on such a large scale. On asking a bystander I came to know that most of these flowers came from the area along the Mysuru – Bengaluru highway. Another observation which I gathered was that this business was mostly run by the Muslim community. A few men nearby were weaving garlands. I decided to take a photograph of them but one guy sitting in the middle told me not to do so because they were doing a ‘religious process’, which shouldn’t be disturbed. A few others sitting beside him laughed but they were too engrossed to look up at what was happening.

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KR Market is one of the few remaining places in Bengaluru which has been untouched by modernity. This place would call me back again because in the midst of all the people and the grime and the sweat lies a raw, unpolished sense of something old and ancient. To an outsider like me, it shows Bengaluru’s past and the way this past has been preserved. Just beside KR Market lies Tipu Sultan’s Summer Palace and Bangalore Fort; the walls of which are still standing to this day. As I was leaving the market, someone got mango juice in a tray for 30 rupees. My body demanded something to cool itself down. Standing near the stairs, I saw this guy selling paan, a commodity which is as important in Assam as sambhar is in Bengaluru. KR Market reminds me of my home in varying ways and I will be coming back soon.

In VV Puram, all you do is eat and eat and eat

We reached early, it was around 6.30 PM and the road was already filled with a sea of people. I and my roommate decided to take a walk as we waited for M and D to arrive. The small stalls selling boiled corn in an assortment of flavours was eye-catching. One can try these out as a form of starters but we decided to keep them for another day. Walking through Food Street, as it is famously known, the smell of the air changed and like a gust of wind blowing at your face, different aromas came to me at once. With every step that I took, it changed from the smell of fried bajjis, the tangy smell of curd in what seemed like dahi puri being made somewhere, the sweet, spicy and nose-tingling smell of potato twisters, samosa and the buttery smell of pav bhaji culminating with freshly brewed coffee as we reached the other side, after a bit of a struggle walking amidst so many people and cars. Cars shouldn’t be allowed to ply on this road because they look menacing and you are always in the fear of being hit from behind. I don’t understand how people can drive on this road; it wouldn’t make them feel hungry with all their windows rolled up. How can one not smell all that?

We reached the other end and decided to wait for our two other friends to arrive. In a few minutes, M came towards us with what looked like vada pav, only that the vada was missing. It was a bun with peanuts topped over a layering of masala with coriander leaves, onion and grated carrots. As I took a bite, I could sense that there was some butter inside too and the entire thing was one explosion of a nutty and spicy feeling. M told me that this was the Congress Bun from the famous VB Bakery, situated at the end of Food Street. The peanuts used in it are a special type known as Congress Kadlekai (peanuts). But why Congress though? Upon some research I came to know that it has many urban legends, one of them being that Congress netas during the British rule used to write messages in chits and pass them between one another in boxes and snacks of peanuts, hidden from the British officials. We went inside VB Bakery where M told us that it was essential to try the Rum Ball (Rs. 30). Divided into four parts, it had a soft chocolaty texture on top while the inside had a surprise of cherry pieces, raisins and cake infused with a bit of rum. The smell was strong and the taste, equally that which managed to stay in my mouth for quite some time.

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Rum ball from VB Bakery

Right opposite to VB Bakery is Sri Vasavi Vaisista Thindi, a place selling South-Indian street food amidst the usual offerings of Button Idly Sambar and Sagu Masala Dosa. Thindi is the Kannada word for breakfast. M suggested that we have to try Aambode (Rs. 40 for two pieces), which is apparently a Kannada funeral food. It is idli shaped although the taste is nothing like a normal idli. It’s made out of tur daal and has peas, onions, coriander leaves, chili and spices in it. Its taste resembled that of a litti that you get in the north, although this was a more spiced up version of that. I wanted to try the button idli but that too was saved for the next time. We decided to try something sweet and jamoon seemed like a nice idea. The buttery soft ball of dripping sweetness glided through with a spoon like a hot knife through butter.

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Dahi kachori in its full glory

Next up, we reached a small shop selling jalebis and a variety of chaats. Dahi kachodi (Rs. 40) caught my eye and we decided to try that out. The place was also selling Obattu, Akki Roti, and Paddu among other things. The dahi kachodi was like sev puri but had kachodi instead of puri, garnished with onion rings, coriander leaves, a dollop of curd, some tamarind chutney, lots of sev and crushed kachori beneath all of that. Sweet, tangy and wholesome are the words to describe it. Just beside this place was Chandni Chowk Hot Honey Jilebi. Although we just had something sweet, it was too tempting to avoid it and move forward. Something sweet right after something tangy and spicy would not be encouraged by many but we were on a hogging spree so what the heck. That is the power of these sweet smelling sugar concoctions. We decided to eat less and got one for each of us. Jalebi never disappoints but more than eating it, what fascinated me more was how it is poured onto the oil in circular, rapid yet calculated movements.

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And this is how jalebis are made

If you think that Food Street is all about food, then you are mistaken. Sitting alongside the road are people selling toys, balloons and bracelets made out of small squares with alphabets written on them. We also found an uncle selling peas on the middle of it all and a few stalls selling fruits. Moving on, M said that Boti Masale is something we ought to try it out. It is made out of a long, cylindrical finger chips. Inside, there is masala consisting of fried chana dal, sev, pineapple pieces, peanuts, moong dal, chopped onions, and chopped chili. The entire thing is garnished with puffed rice and coriander leaves. A light snack compared to everything we have had till now.

Going to VV Puram and not taking a stop at The Chaat Shop would be a mistake you cannot afford to commit. This place has the craziest chaat combinations I have seen till date. Some of them were Jalebi Chaat, Basket Chaat Tikki Rasgulla Chaat and Nachos Chaat. But, the potato twisters right beside seemed more enticing to us and considering the fact that D loved them, we decided to buy it. The twisted potato slices were spicy and got us looking for our water bottles with our tongues flaring out. The slices were crunchier than any other potato twister I have had till date. This made us frantically look for something to cool ourselves down and kulfi seemed like a good idea. Situated right across the street was Mumbai Badam Milk Lassi Center, advertising all form of faloodas, milk shakes, baadam milk and kulfis. Every name had Mumbai in front of them, which made us all the more confused as to what to buy. Finally, we decided with Gulkand Kulfi which sounded a bit simple. Nothing exceptional about the kulfi though, it had a nice proportion of dry fruits inside of it and thankfully wasn’t melting all over our hands.

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These potato twisters will spice up your life

After our engines cooled down, we decided to continue the hogging spree. By now, it was nearing 9PM, and the crowd had thinned down a bit. We huddled in front of Shri Vasavi Thindi Mane and all around us was a crowd of hungry, peering population. I concluded that this is one of those hit places in VV Puram. We glanced through the menu and among Paneer Roll, Veg Roll and Roomali Roti, pizza caught my eye. Pineapple Cheese Chilli Pizza (Rs. 70) was what caught my eye. It seems blasphemous to have pizza from such a place but after thinking it through, we decided that an experience of a pineapple pizza from a non-pizza place should not be missed. The order took around 20 minutes to arrive. And all that time, we were fixated on the guy who was making the Roomali Rotis. His hand movements and the way he flipped the roti multiple times before putting it on the inverted kadhai, prompted all of us to use Instagram’s boomerang feature to its fullest. D told us that maybe we should have reconsidered our order. Well, it was too late for that. The pizza arrived and it was smaller than what we expected. Garnished with yellow and red capsicums with green bell peppers and pineapple pieces, it looked cute. I was having pineapple pizza for the first time and to many people, I was committing blasphemy. We have all seen the memes but after having the first bite, I mentally said screw you to all those memes. The cheesy taste mingled with the sour and sweetness from the pineapple, until the bell peppers hit you. The cheese was evenly melted and the crust was properly cooked. All in all, it was nothing like what the Internet suggested it to be. The Roomali Roti was saved for the future visit. We were almost at the end of the street and it was time to try the famous bajji that Food Street was famous for. Sri Swamy Bajji Centre is the place to be which was again crowded with hungry bajji eaters. We decided to go with Mangaluru Bajji (Rs. 10 for 3 pieces), as suggested by M yet again. Opposite to the road was a shop selling Obattu and I knew that this had to be consumed. I have a soft corner for Obattu, one of the few Kannada dishes that I really like. I have forgotten what the name of the establishment was but it is situated opposite to the bajji shop. It sold Obattu, Puliyogre, Rava Idly and different types of Baath. Dal Obbatu it was! For those of you who don’t know, Obattu is a sweet dish, which looks like a paratha of sorts. Dal Obattu is made by putting a dollop of the paste of dal inside a ball made out of dough from flour, rolled out like a chappati and fried on a tawa with ghee. It is quite sweet and might not appeal everyone but for me, it was definitely the highlight of the day. Somehow, it went really well with the Mangaluru Bajji.

Nothing ends without a cup of kaapi and to mark the end of this frenzy filled food fiesta, we decided to go to By2 Coffee to fulfill our caffeine needs. VV Puram is indeed a place to eat and eat. There is a lot more to explore in this place which would ideally take two or maybe more visits. We missed out on a lot of places and a lot of food but all of that has been noted down for the next visit. Food Street is definitely one of the must-go places in Bengaluru and is bound to take out the foodie within you. If you are not fond of the food, just go and observe the crowd. You won’t be disappointed.

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Filter coffee to end the day

 

 

The story so far

First month in a city where the sun rarely shines

So, how is college and Bangalore treating you?

Answering this question, which was asked by my mother over a telephone call, is very difficult for me to put in a few words. One of the main reasons why I chose Bangalore for my higher studies is because of its amazing climate. This trait sets Bangalore apart from many cities in this country like Delhi, Calcutta where the weather is simply pathetic and totally unsuitable for someone like me. Just so you know, I am very sensitive to hot summers and the heat. I prefer to live in a place where the climate is serene, cold and comfortable. Bangalore ticks all the boxes, although there is significant change seen nowadays, and so here I am.

I had to skip my Christ University entrance exams for reasons (which were out of my control) which would be revealed perhaps in another blog post and this resulted in me applying for the BA EJP course in St. Joseph’s College (all thanks to my sister. She knows why).  I was skeptical at first regarding my decision to apply in this college. For me, the decision of coming to Bangalore and studying meant only one thing, to somehow get an admission in Christ Uni. So, when I wasn’t able to give my exams for Christ Uni, I was dejected, obviously. But, let’s not go into the realms of my personal apathy. That’s for another blog.

And thus, I gave my entrance exams for St. Joseph’s in the month of June without any kind of preparation or whatsoever. Miraculously, I was accepted to the college. Truth be told, this came as a little bit of surprise as I had no idea what I had answered in the psychology paper. Don’t blame me here; I had no idea that there was a separate paper for psychology in the first place. Did I forget to mention that I had no idea what psychology was in the first place? (all I had was a very obscure, vague idea about it)

I went for my interview, which was scheduled three days after my entrance test, in semi formals. It was a hot day and I was practically sweating underneath my teal blue full-sleeved shirt out of sheer nervousness and because of the humidity as well. My interview was taken by a professor who spoke in a really graceful and polite manner, extinguishing every single drop of nervousness that was within me. He asked me where I was from, the language we spoke at my home and the reason for choosing this course. I answered all of these questions in the best way I could find possible. I came to know later that the person who took my interview was Professor Cheriyan Alexander.

I met the Vice Principal and took the fee receipts. I was admitted to St. Joseph’s after two days.

Fast forward to almost a month later I shifted to Bangalore. Carrying 23 kilograms of baggage, I found myself in the doorstep of my sister’s place here in Whitefield. The weather was cloudy but it wasn’t raining. My cab driver told me that it had been raining for the last couple of days and that the rains arrive particularly during the evenings. My classes were scheduled to start after two days which meant I had to buy the necessities and shift to Shanthinagar without any delay.

Classes started after two days (well it had already started a week before) and I was really surprised to see that the crowd was really alive with energy and people had already mingled with each other over a span of just one week. Then there was the really tedious task of remembering almost 50 names, a task which took me close to two weeks to fully accomplish. It didn’t take me long to realize that the people here were really warm and welcoming and in a matter of few days I was one of them. The sense of belongingness which I got was really heartwarming; something which I was perhaps craving for a long, long time. The most amazing part in between all of this is undeniably, the professor in our department. They are probably some of the most chilled out and people I have ever met. Kind, benevolent, charismatic and friendly is the words which come to my mind right now. The trio, comprising of Professor Arul Mani; the walking encyclopedia of everything literature, Professor Etienne; the ruthless critic and Professor Cheriyan; the polite, eloquent speaker were the driving force in the English Department. Prof. Arul Mani, a person with a long beard and a ponytail, always wearing kurtas and preferring bright colours, sarcastic and witty in a positive manner and an absolute genius is perhaps the funniest teacher I have ever had in all my 19 years of existence. Sometimes when I am attending his classes, I wonder why he hadn’t joined the film industry to be an actor. He would have been an excellent actor. Someday, I am going to ask him this question.

He loves to squash people under the palm of his hand (that was a joke)

One thing which I believe sets St. Joseph’s apart is the importance that is being given to extracurricular activities.  A college which has close to 50 associations, a ton of sport events, literary and cultural fests, amazing certificate courses is something which is not seen everywhere. I don’t know about the other colleges in the city but this culture here of not having an entirely academic oriented fashion of learning is something which has really captivated me. The best part is the teachers who actually motivate and guide you to take part in all of these events.

Life in Joseph’s has been an enriching experience so far. Movie screenings, going to events for collecting reporting pieces during weekends, creative writing sessions, tutorial sessions, quiz clubs, literary events, CIAs has surely made life a lot busier and minimally hectic but there is absolute fun in doing all of this.

Bangalore has been kind to me, for now. Other than the constant rain and the annoyingly disgusting PG food, everything is going good for me. The people are helpful and kind, the place is awesome, the locality where I live is pretty great and finally I have started learning the drums. I don’t think there’s anything more that I can ask for, period