Church Street 2017: In pictures

 

 

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Church Street is located almost in the middle of the map of Bangalore and is regarded by many as the numero uno destination for the youth of the city. The 750 metres stretch houses some of the most iconic places in Bangalore like Blossom Book House, Church Street Social, Amoeba Sports Bar, Indian Coffee House, Hotel Empire and numerous pubs for the thirsty weekenders. BBMP took an ambitious step in February 2017 to create an underground electricity and water pipeline system and as a result, the entire stretch of road had to be dug up. The estimated time allotted for the entire project was six months. It has been more than six months now and the work is far from complete. Business has been affected and the public hasn’t been happy with the turn of events. The pictures below show the Church Street of 2017.

 

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If one gets down in front of Hotel Empire, this is what he/she would be greeted with. Currently, this part of the street is the most affected as there is construction happening on both sides of the road as a result of which entry to Church Street has been stopped temporarily. Parking outside Hotel Empire has been prohibited, much to the dismay of the staff. “Business has been hit really hard. People have turned away because there is no place to park their huge vehicles”, says Sayed, an employee of Hotel Empire. Access to the hotel has been closed from one side which has been causing inconvenience to customers. The street becomes increasingly muddy due to all of the digging which is a nightmare for pedestrians.

 

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These are the pipes which have been laid down alongside the road. All of them are electrical lines while a central concrete pipe runs beneath, carrying water from the storm drains. There will be underground junction boxes beside the electrical lines. Also, there will be manholes like the one visible in the picture above. Abbas, a worker in the BBMP says, “It has been problematic for us to work because of the traffic. It is a good thing vehicular entry is barred now. Most of the delay is only due to traffic and the rains. Work will be over mostly within the next three months”.  The electrical wires inside the pipes haven’t been laid yet and Abbas is clueless as to when that will be done. One can see that the trees alongside the road have been preserved although there are a few which had to be cut down.

 

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Entry of four wheelers has been prohibited in the area and parking on the side of the road would result in towing. The towing truck makes multiple rounds in the area and it is mostly the two wheelers who become the prey. As I was standing alongside the road, one guy came in an Audi and asked a man standing beside me for a place where one could pay some cash and park his/her vehicle. The man said he had never heard of such a place and warned him about the towing truck. “There’s no way they can tow the car away. Look at the road. I would love to see them try”, the man chuckled and walked off. Traders have been demanding the complete ban of vehicles which is the chief reason behind the delay in the completion of the project. Vehicles make walking all the more difficult as there is always one car that is stuck in the middle of the road somewhere.

 

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It was a Saturday afternoon. One doesn’t need to be informed that Saturdays are the time of the week when Church Street comes to life. In spite of all the inconvenience, there was a line of youngsters waiting outside Russh, one of the most happening pubs in the area, known for its attractive happy hour offers. Such is the spirit of Bangaloreans! “I don’t come here frequently. I thought I will come here and park my scooter but then I had to go all the way around to MG Road and park it and then I had to walk till here. That’s a real inconvenience”, says Afnas, a student.

 

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The work is more or less complete once you cross Blossoms Book House. The footpaths are yet to be constructed properly and there are uncovered manholes everywhere. All the establishments alongside the road were given a notice prior to the start of the project and most of them had been supportive of the idea. But, as time has passed, business has been hit and there has been a foul cry due to that. “It’s not that bad anymore. Earlier, the water from the streets used to come when the digging was taking place. All the shops had to pay for the new electrical connections but I don’t think anyone has complained with regard to all that. We believe that it is for the greater good so it’s fine”, says Rooh, an employee at Amoeba Sports Bar. One of the BBMP workers told me that the entire complex which houses shops like Hysteria and the electronics shops (picture above) will be demolished and a new building has been instructed to set up.

 

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Uncovered manholes like this pose a grave threat to pedestrians, especially when it is raining.

 

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This is the road right next to the Times Network office and is the zone where most of the work is taking place. The first impression one would get from looking at this site is an area struck by a bomb blast. Electrical and water pipes crisscross each other and it is difficult to make out which is going where. Workers have been working tirelessly to complete the work in this zone. Vehicular traffic is completely prohibited as there is no place for cars to go. One can only imagine the plight of people living in the houses on the far side of the street due to this disruption.

The redevelopment project for the roads has been undertaken by TenderSURE with a budget of Rs. 9 crores. The entire project was divided into two phases. This part of the area belongs to Phase I while Phase II is from Rest House Crescent Road junction to St. Mark’s Road junction. So the next you go to Church Street, don’t be surprised if a JCB like the one above is blocking your path, although it is highly advisable to not tread this road when it’s raining.

 

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All photographs have been taken with a Moto G3 and have been post-processed using VSCO

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Firing on all five ‘Piston’s

I had heard of this thrash metal band called Piston for quite some time now. The first time I came across the name was on a Facebook post by a friend who had watched them live and was writing about how ‘tight’ their performance was. And when I saw that they were going to perform at VR Mall on the 24th, I was all the more intrigued, mostly because of the venue. I called my sister up asking if she was interested but she sounded disgusted when I sounded thrash metal. “Not my scene bro” was all she said.

After a gruesome and traffucked two-hour drive with two uncles in an Uber, I reached Phoenix Marketcity. The courtyard is the place where all performances generally happen and I jogged my way to the venue only to find a reggae concert in action. People were cheering from their seats amidst the banging of djembes and other types of drums. The singer was telling the crowd to put their hands up. I looked around for help from someone to guide me at the right direction; mostly I was looking for someone wearing a metal t-shirt like me. I decided to go to VR Mall, which is right beside Phoenix Marketcity, maybe the show was happening inside the mall. It was already 7.30, the show was supposed to start from 7. I asked one of the security guards if a show was happening somewhere and he pointed towards the left. I followed his finger and saw a small platform that had been erected and some twenty clueless people lingering around. Some kind of a live EDM track was playing from the speakers, which was bizarre. The four people on stage were all clad in black, three of them having a guitar and one of them with glorious, curly long hair. Something I could only wish for.

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Unlike most heavy metal concerts, nobody stood near the stage

Across the mixing table, I saw four guys wearing metal tees, looking all pumped up while the rest of the crowd murmured and continued to linger around. The weather was windy and chilly, after the rain. Someone from the mixing table started speaking on the mic. Took me a while to figure out where the sound was coming from. Salman U. Syed, the boss of Bangalore Open Air welcomed the gathering and talked about the ‘promotion’ that they were doing for the fest, by organising this show. The drummer of the band spoke next, introducing themselves and pointing out that this was the first time a metal band in Bangalore was playing in a mall. They played the first song and surprisingly, it was the drummer who was singing and not the guy with the long hair, who I presumed was the singer. Whoa moment, indeed. I know Rakshith on Facebook, because I went to ask for drum lessons from him a long time ago. That didn’t work out. The sound was achingly loud and distorted but that is what you get from an open air venue like this. Towards the end of their second song, Rakshith said that their singer was sick and couldn’t make it so he was taking up vocal duties for the day.

I was more interested to look at the crowd. Most of them had no idea what was going on. There were a few uncles and auntys who were making faces while Piston was covering Slayer. Five hands went up when the band announced if the crowd knew who Slayer was. Only those five hands clapped after the second song. “It’s very odd for us to play here. We usually play in places where people are drunk as f**k. I see a few people who look my parents and that is so weird because they have never approved this kind of music” Same story everywhere, I tell you.

The quintet went on to play a few more songs and covers while the crowd slowly got the hang of their “no core, no fiction and only 80s thrash metal inspired by real life events” music. Rakshith kept alive the profanity and made the crowd realise that the music is a bit difficult to take in and also pointing out facts like God indeed is dead. Their rendition of Slayer’s Disciple proved the statement for them. For a moment, I was worried if this venue was appropriate for such subtle blasphemy but luckily there wasn’t any divine intervention. I, for one, was happy that this music was being introduced to an oblivious population. I heard a few girls admiring the rhythm guitarist’s long hair, an aunty telling her husband “aise gaane sunta kaun hai bhai?” (Who listens to music like this?) and a father coaxing her five year old daughter to dance to it while he tried to click a few pictures of her. The drummer was the only person who did all of the talking on behalf of the band and apart from giving reality checks like of how the world is a living misery, he did a pretty good job on the drums. Personally, I was left with a constant ringing in my ears after the show was over, mostly because I was standing too close to the speakers and guitars were too distorted. All in all, it was a good show, the first of its kind. People were affected by it, in both ways. And yes, metal is pretty much alive in this city.